Bifidobacterium infantis and HMO oligosaccharides to modulate the intestinal microbiota, study

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bifidobacterium-infantis-and-hmo-oligosaccharides-to-modulate-the-intestinal-microbiota-study

The probiotic bacterium Bifidobacterium infantis (B. infantis) and HMO (Human Milk Oligosaccharides) oligosaccharides can help modulate the intestinal microbiota in adults, as well as in newborns.

A recent clinical study (Button et al., 2023) suggests the effectiveness of this combination of probiotics and complex sugars in the recovery of intestinal eubiosis, following antibiotic treatments. (1)

1) Bifidobacterium infantis and HMO oligosaccharides

Bifidobacterium infantis it has been the subject of almost 400 scientific publications which have highlighted its crucial role in the development and maintenance of a balanced microbiota already in the neonatal phase. (2) As well as stimulating the production of numerous vitamins, including B1, B2, B6, B9, B12 and vitamin C.

Target of research is to explore the combination of B. infantis and HMO oligosaccharides, to understand whether it can contribute to modulating the intestinal microbiota also in adult subjects. With a view to developing innovative therapeutic approaches, in various clinical contexts.

2) Clinical study

The clinical study under examination was conducted on a small sample of 56 healthy adults, 17 of whom underwent a 5-day course of antibiotics and the administration of Bifidobacterium infantis and HMO for 28 days.

The approach multidisciplinary research included in-depth analyzes of feces and blood, with sampling at pre-established intervals for 35 days, to evaluate the impact of probiotics and HMOs on the microbiota and metabolic parameters.

An outline of the study design with 56 healthy participants assigned to 3 cohorts. Antibiotics only (Abx): A 5-day course of vancomycin (250 mg dose/3 times daily) and metronidazole (500 mg dose/3 times daily) on days 1-5. Antibiotics and B. infantis: The same course of antibiotics with B. infantis (≥ 8 × 10 9 colony-forming units [CFU]/dose once daily) on days 1-14. Antibiotics, B. infantis and HMO: The same course of antibiotics with B. infantis and with HMO (9 g twice daily for a total of 18 g/day) on days 1-28. Stool collection days are indicated in bold.
Figure 1. An outline of the study design with 56 healthy participants assigned to 3 cohorts. Antibiotics only (Abx): A 5-day course of vancomycin (250 mg dose/3 times daily) and metronidazole (500 mg dose/3 times daily) on days 1-5. Antibiotics and B. infantis: The same course of antibiotics with B. infantis (≥ 8 × 10 9 colony-forming units [CFU]/dose once daily) on days 1-14. Antibiotics, B. infantis and HMO: The same course of antibiotics with B. infantis and with HMO (9 g twice daily for a total of 18 g/day) on days 1-28. Stool collection days are indicated in bold. (1)
3) Results of the study

Participants that they received Bifidobacterium infantis and HMO have demonstrated considerable success in taking root of the precious probiotic in the intestine. This phenomenon has been associated with:

– significant changes in metabolite levels, indicative of alterations in microbial metabolism,

– increased abundance of Veillonella bacteria, which in turn are known for producing compounds beneficial to human health.

The trending of healthy microbiomes with Abx led to consistently high levels of B. infantis engraftment in subjects co-treated with HMO.
Figure 2. The trend of healthy microbiomes with Abx led to consistently high levels of B. infantis engraftment in subjects co-treated with HMO.(1)

4) Perspectives

The results of the study clinical suggest that the combination of Bifidobacterium infantis and HMO oligosaccharides may have a positive impact on the modulation of the intestinal microbiota in adults. (4) this discovery could pave the way for more precise and reproducible biotherapeutic therapies, in the different clinical contexts where disorders and pathologies associated with microbiota imbalances are found.

Researchers they plan to extend the trial, with particular attention to leukemia patients who undergo stem cell transplants. (5) Since this treatment is known to disrupt the gut microbiota, the combination of B. infantis and HMO could prove promising as a possible supportive therapy. (6)

5) Provisional conclusions

under review – which adds to the extensive literature on the numerous benefits of Bifidobacterium infantis and HMO oligosaccharides – strengthens the belief that their combination can offer significant benefits in modulating the intestinal microbiota in adults, paving the way for new therapeutic perspectives for restoring damaged microbiota and improving overall health. Further research is needed to investigate and confirm these findings.

Gabriele Sapienza

Footnotes

(1) Julie E. Button, Casey M. Cosetta,  Abigail L. Reens, David J. Rechtman, Robert R. Jenq, Gregory J. McKenzi (2023). Precision modulation of dysbiotic adult microbiomes with a human-milk-derived synbiotic reshapes gut microbial composition and metabolites. Cell Host & Microbe https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chom.2023.08.004

(2) Hegar B, Wibowo Y, Basrowi RW, Ranuh RG, Sudarmo SM, Munasir Z, Atthiyah AF, Widodo AD, Supriatmo, Kadim M, Suryawan A, Diana NR, Manoppo C, Vandenplas Y. The Role of Two Human Milk Oligosaccharides, 2′-Fucosyllactose and Lacto-N-Neotetraose, in Infant Nutrition. Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol Nutr. 2019 Jul;22(4):330-340. doi: 10.5223/pghn.2019.22.4.330. Epub 2019 Jun 25. PMID: 31338308; PMCID: PMC6629589. https://doi.org/10.5223%2Fpghn.2019.22.4.330

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Graduated in Agronomy, with experience in sustainable agriculture and permaculture, laboratory and ecological monitoring.